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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun
comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
. >>> here are the developments we're following this morning on the disaster in japan. president obama is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is p
. officials in japan hope the helicopter bucket brigade can keep the reactors from overheating while the plant operators scramble to install a power line and use electricity to restore the reactor's cooling systems. >>> now, less than an hour ago, word came that the united states will start evacuating americans from japan, including private citizens and the families of u.s. personnel. president obama informed japan's prime minister of the plans tonight. the obama administration is chartering aircraft to accommodate americans who want to leave. also today the chairman of the u.s. regulatory commission says radiation near the fukushima plant is extremely high and damage at one reactor and worse than the japanese officials have acknowledged. >> and janna katsuyama just returned hours ago from tokyo. she is here now live. but how are the people feeling there now? >> well, it is a difficult situation there. walking through tokyo, the trains and the stations and the airport, there wasn't really any signs of panic or chaos. but we did find many foreigners quietly leaving. driving from tokyo to hanita
) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioactive fuel rods covered up so they
plant in japan. right now, emergency workers are risking their lives to prevent a complete nuclear meltdown. crews began the first of four helicopter water drops. at the same time, workers on the ground are using a water cannon meant for riots to shoot water directly into one of the reactors. it is a desperate last ditch effort to keep spent nuclear fuel rods from melting. in a potentially troubling sign white steam was again seen rising from three of the reactors. radiation levels at the plant dangerously high. japan's electric company is working desperately to reconnect power at the plant today. meantime, damning reports about the owner of the japanese power plant. accord to the australian, the owner falsified safety data and said in 1989 tokyo electric injected air into the containment vessel of a reactor number one to lower the leak rate and when caught apologized for "dishonest practices." now, abc's martha raddatz with the latest on the last ditch effort to saint planet. >>> 50 workers inside the plant working in the dark with nothing but flash lights wearing overalls and hea
's go back to dave and pam. >>> all right. thank you, sal. in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on the earthquake damaged nuclear plant trying to prevent a meltdown. the helicopter crews can only work about 40 minutes at a time for their own safety to limit radiation exposure. now the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says there's no more water in one of the spent fuel pools at the plant. increasing the chance of widespread nuclear fallout. however, japanese officials deny that that pool is dry. the u.s. government is now chartering airplanes to help evacuate u.s. citizens from japan because of the rising radiation levels. voluntary evacuation to family members of government employees. >>> time now 5:01. scientists here on the west coast are closely watching the movement of the radioactive plume coming from the crippled japanese nuclear reactors. it's expected to hit the illusion islands south of alaska some time today. that plume is then expected to reach southern california late tomorrow. the health experts are emphasizing radiation levels are plunging as th
>>> in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on an earthquake damaged nuclear plant. the other efforts underway to prevent a meltdown. >>> a big chunk of highway 1 has collapsed and tumbled towards the pacific ocean. what crews are saying about how long it will be closed. >> reporter: the waves at mavericks have taken another life this morning. new details about the frantic efforts to pull the surfer from the water. >>> good morning to you. welcome to thursday. it's march 17th. it's st. patrick's day. i'm dave clark. >> good morning. i'm pam cook. thank you for joining us. let's check in with steve paulson. how does the weather look today? >>> good morning, pamela, dave, clear skies. patch or two of fog, some clouds to the north but over us right now clear and cold. 30s showing up. something we haven't seen for a while. sunshine for a while and then partly cloudy skies. if you're northward there are a few showers starting to move through. we'll talk about that plus a big change in our weather for friday. now sal with an update on traffic. >>> steve, right now on west
the every-changing situation in japan. we'll have live updates on "america this morning" and later on "good morning america." also stay up to date any time at abcnews.com. >>> moving on to other news beginning with libya. four "new york times" journalists who have been covering the fighting there are now missing. pull its zero prize winning reporter anthony shadid, stephen farrell and photographers tyler hicks and linsey add dario were last heard from on tuesday. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's forces have been battling rebels in a key city in eastern libya. there could be a vote today in the u.n. security council on whether to impose a no-fly zone over libya. >>> meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton was in cairo talking through an unscheduled stroll -- taking an unscheduled stroll through tahrir square, the symbolic center of egypt's revolution. she urged egyptians to not let extremists ruin what they've already accomplished. clinton saying she will not stay on as the nation's top diplomat if president obama is re-elected. she also says she has no interest in another run for the whit
americans who are in japan it is time to consider getting out today, thursday, march 17th, 2011. >> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," disaster in japan with matt lauer and meredith vieira. live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >> good morning. welcome to "today" on a thursday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm savannah guthrie in for meredith who is on assignment. a sign of how desperate things are in japan that they are willing to try such a long shot. helicopters dropping water from the air. >> want to take a look at the video right now. as you can see when they do that a significant amount of that water seems to be dispersed by the wind. now massive high pressure water cannons, the kind you have seen police use on rioters will be used to hoes dose down the reac from the ground. more on this desperate attempt just ahead. >>> growing disagreement today between officials in japan and here in the u.s. over the severity of the situation. the chair of the u.s. regulatory commission believes a storage pool holding highly radioactive spent fuel rods may be completely empty at
and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan. families are leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. leaving is not an option for many. there are not enough places to go. if there is a major leak of radiation there does not seem to be a plan either. the family has not been told about it. they are watching developments further north with consternation. they have a baby and don't trust what the government is telling them. >> the government says we are safe but i don't think so. i don't trust them. >> one that? >> because [unintelligible] >> what is this? this is new? >> instead they are making their own plans. a car standing by to head south at a moment's notice. >> as they struggle goes on to prevent a major nuclear disaster many foreign governments are advising nationals to leave tokyo. the u.s. is not allowing any of its military within 80 kilometers of the plant. the japanese government has only told people within 20 kilometers to leave. we have obtained footage from a local tv crew wants to tell the story of those trapped. >> a japanese team makes
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
show. i'm greg gutfeld. t: exposed fue, leaking radiation and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true,
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)